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Jan
17
2013

Video leaks BlackBerry Z10 details before RIM official announcement

Previously, Technically Motivated briefly covered BlackBerry 10, Research in Motion's attempt to modernise it's once-popular BlackBerry range of phones and other devices and the proprietary BlackBerry OS system running on them; and to make BlackBerry relevant to the modern generation once again. We also know that BlackBerry plan to launch two models of phone at first to run this system: first, a fully touchscreen model recently officially named the Z10; and then, a month or two later, a keyboard-equipped model akin to its popular Bold line, tentatively known as the T-Series.

RIM have been keeping very mum over the new system and phones, choosing not to reveal any major details until the official launch announcement of BlackBerry 10, still two weeks away. However, with regular leaks from RIM's manufacturing partners; and tech reviewers getting prototype models, there has slowly been a number of details being released about both.

A new video making the rounds, however, might be the best look we’ve had yet. German newspaper Telekom Presse, after a hands-on with a prototype model of the Z10, recently released two YouTube videos detailing both the software and hardware of the upcoming BlackBerry phone quite extensively.

The first seven-and-a-half minute video, which has been given English subtitles to be easy to understand by those who don't speak German, describes almost everything the phone has and does; and assuming RIM doesn’t make any substantial changes to the model that hits markets, you may well be looking at the final product here, albeit without the official explanations and highlighting that RIM will be doing when it’s announced.

With that said, what are your views on this potential new phone? Do you think RIM has a chance with this new model and system; or are they too far down to be saved? Let us know in the comments!

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    Feb
    11
    2011

    BlackBerry PlayBook will reportedly support Google Android apps

    Well, this is a bit of a surprise. Research In Motion – otherwise known as RIM and famous for the BlackBerry line of smartphones – is reportedly working to ensure that the BlackBerry PlayBook can support some apps from the Google Android platform.

    BlackBerry PlayBook is RIM’s first attempt at entering the Tablet Computer market, by making a device that’s larger and fully touch-screen. With BlackBerry having never made a Tablet before, it’s hard to judge how good they’ll be at it until the Tablet has been in customer’s hands long enough – and considering there are already established competitors in the market in the guise of Apple’s iPad and the range of Android tablets, this means RIM will need something special to encourage users to take a look at it instead.

    So RIM are reportedly looking at making the PlayBook compatible with Google Android apps, in order to widen their market, and increase familiarity from those who may be interested in switching from Android. The rumours come from Bloomberg, who cite the following statement, credited to “anonymous sources close to Google”:

    RIM plans to integrate the technology with the PlayBook operating system, giving customers access to Android’s more than 130,000 apps, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the effort isn’t public. RIM, after looking outside the company, is developing the software internally and may have it ready in the second half, two people said.

    However, RIM won’t be using Google’s Dalvik Java software due to patent issues.

    Android certainly is growing in popularity, and given that we don’t have a BlackBerry tablet precedent, it might be helpful to have a feature that is familiar to a wider audience to bring more customers in. This doesn’t mean that the PlayBook is automatically going to be a strong alternative to the iPad and Android, but it will certainly garner some extra attention it might not have otherwise.