Fresh Off The Block


Jan
09
2011

US wants Twitter data of “Wikileaks activists”

Ever since Wikileaks caused drama by leaking United States diplomatic cables – something I’m sure most people have heard about by now, and if not just look it up on the net – the US government has started an investigation to try to bring Wikileaks “to justice”. I put “to justice” in quotes not because I am taking the side of Wikileaks (I am neither pro or anti Wikileaks), but rather because not everyone agrees on this matter.

Anyway, apparently as part of this investigation, the US Attorney’s office has convinced a District Court judge data held by Twitter is “relevant and material to [the] ongoing criminal investigation”; as a result, Twitter was earlier in the year served a subpoena, and now is forced to give over data related to various Twitter accounts believed to be related to either Julian Assange (the founder of Wikileaks) or Wikileaks itself – including Julian Assange’s own Twitter, plus those of Birgitta Jonsdottir, an Icelandic MP; and Bradley E. Manning, a militant supposedly responsible for the leaking of some of the cables; among others.

The reason we are aware of this subpoena is because Twitter was recently able to overturn a gagging order originally served with it. A gagging order prevents a person from revealing information under penalty of law. After getting the gag, Twitter fought back and successfully got the gagging order lifted; so Twitter is now legally allowed to let the public – and the respective account holders – know about the US Attorney’s Office’s demand to hand over data.

According to the BBC, the data demanded from Twitter by the US Attorney’s office includes “mailing addresses and billing information, connection records and session times, IP addresses used to access Twitter, email accounts, as well as the ‘means and source of payment'”.

It will be interesting to see how this all plays out. Feel free to discuss in the comments below (consider this an open politics discussion thread), but keep it civil.

[Many thanks to BBC News for breaking this news!]

Digiprove sealThis informative article has been Digiproved © 2011

What Our Visitors are Talking About


Latest CommentsOn Twitter Right Now
  • “Unlock” Dialogue for Clone System tool in Aomei Backupper 2.5 by William Sims
  • Microsoft gets 561 million euro fine for missing browser ballot “oversight” by Gamer Repulic's Dorthea
  • Microsoft gets 561 million euro fine for missing browser ballot “oversight” by Sherman Moya
  • Microsoft gets 561 million euro fine for missing browser ballot “oversight” by Microsoft gets 561 million euro fine for missing browser ballot “oversight” | The Sanitarium.FM
  • Valve’s Steam Gaming Computer: What we know so far by Valve's Steam Gaming Computer: What we know so far | The Sanitarium.FM
  • Tweet to @TMWeb to have your comments appear here!

    Previous Articles


    Dec
    12
    2010

    It’s a cyber war, and WikiLeaks is the cause

    Folks, we could be at the verge of the very first global war on technology. Or at least, that’s what the hackers want us to think.

    The battle centres on Washington’s fierce attempts to close down WikiLeaks and shut off the supply of confidential US government cables. For those of you who haven’t kept up with the latest news, WikiLeaks is a well-known whistleblower site that encourages people to post secret documents they’ve managed to get their hands on, so they can be made public and the information contained within made known to everyone – and the people responsible are kept completely anonymous. Lately, WikiLeaks is responsible for leaking the content of a long chain of confidential documents and communications between the US government. Naturally, the US are a little pissed off about it. Mike Huckabee, a former Arkansas governor, said those who passed the secrets to WikiLeaks should be executed. Sarah Palin demanded the founder of WikiLeaks be hunted in the same way an al-Qaeda operative would be pursued.

    Recently, the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, was arrested in Britain, after British authorities received an arrest warrant from Swedish prosecutors eager to question him on unrelated allegations of rape. News of his arrest, even on unrelated charges, pleased the US authorities. “That sounds like good news to me,” said Robert Gates, US secretary of defence. The US now want Assange to answer to the actions of those using his website to leak the government cables, and his role in helping the leaks get widespread, and have made calls for Assange to be extradited to the US to face charges of espionage.

    Yet even as Assange prepared to appear in a London court last week, an unlikely alliance of defenders had begun plotting to turn on the forces circling WikiLeaks. They were beginning to attack Amazon, which had been persuaded to sever links with WikiLeaks by Joe Lieberman, who heads the US Senate’s homeland security committee; they also hit every domain name system (DNS) that broke WikiLeaks.org’s domain name: Mastercard, Visa and Paypal, which stopped facilitating donations to the site, and the Swiss post office which froze WikiLeaks’ bank account. Read the rest of this entry »

    Digiprove sealThis informative article has been Digiproved © 2010