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Apr
11
2017

Privacy Conscious? Don’t Be Too Hasty To Download Windows 10 Creator’s Update

A white Windows 10 Logo on a blue background

The wait is nearly over for Windows users. On April 11th, the long-awaited "Creators Update" will launch for Windows 10, bringing with it such useful features as a new "night light" mode that reduces the amount of blue light emitted by your screen so that you an sleep better; a new Windows Defender Security Centre, where users can tweak their security options in one place; and a Game Mode for better performance while gaming among lots of other tweaks. People who do not want to wait for the update to be offered to them through Windows Update can get ahead of the game by downloading Microsoft's upgrade tool to apply the update right now – but a recent report suggests privacy-conscious users may want to hold off from jumping on the bandwagon early.

According to an article by Tom's Hardware, which has been backed up by numerous less patient users, Microsoft's Windows 10 Update Assistant may not honour your Privacy Settings if you use it to upgrade to the Creators Update yourself. Instead, the Assistant tries to use default settings – whether or not you choose to upgrade or clean install the new version – meaning that if you changed your privacy settings when you installed Windows 10 and subsequently use the Assistant, you may need to keep a close eye on just what is being set, or you may find Windows suddenly gathering more data about you than you originally intended.

Those default settings encourage you to share your location and provide full diagnostic data to Microsoft to fix issues and improve future iterations of Windows 10. The default options also encourage enabling Cortana and receiving targeted ads rather than generic ones. The good news here is that Microsoft is being much more transparent about the data it collects – and when applying the Creators Update, the privacy options offer up clearer descriptions of what they do and the effects enabling or disabling them will have.

If you're not looking forward to going back through all those checkboxes, however, Microsoft state that when the upgrade is made available through Windows Update some time during April 11th, existing privacy settings WILL be honoured. We'll know for sure if this is the case soon enough – but as always, it's wise to look before you leap.

This article first appeared on Sanitarium.FM under the title Windows 10 Creators Edition Available Now – But Keep An Eye On Your Privacy Settings.

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    Previous Articles


    Jan
    21
    2017

    Need storage? Seagate 4TB Barracuda on Sale at Amazon and NewEgg

    While Solid State Drives may slowly be taking over the world of computer storage due to their fast speeds and lack of spinning parts, if you're looking to store lots of things – maybe you work in a job where regular backups are key, you edit videos a lot, or you're a heavy gamer – or you want reliability, there's still no better than a traditional Hard Drive. And now Seagate is making it easier to get lots of storage for very little outlay – how about 4 Terabytes for $105 (roughly £85.20)?

    That's how much Seagate's 4TB Barracuda drive is on sale for at Amazon's US site, and at NewEgg, which claims the price will stick until Wednesday. At a price that equates to roughly 2p ($0.03) a Gigabyte, this price pitches the Barracuda even cheaper than the cheapest SSDs.

    Take note that the Barracuda line is intended for "general purpose" storage, and thus doesn't have the highest speed when compared to more performance-focused lines like the Barracuda Pro. That said, when the drive is rated to deliver read and write speeds of 146MB/s on average, with a maximum sustained data rate of up to 180MB/s, in most general situations you're hardly going to complain. The 4TB model also sports 64MB of cache, meaning it should get going quickly for your more regular tasks; and also has a SATA 6Gbps interface.

    As of the time of writing, NewEgg is already out-of-stock, so be sure to act fast when the stock comes back if you want one!

    Apr
    19
    2016

    Ditch QuickTime on Windows – Apple Drop Support for Vulnerable Plugin

    A recent version of the Quicktime logo.

    A recent version of the Quicktime logo.

    Apple are dropping support for Quicktime, a plugin for viewing and streaming video, on Windows on account of no longer being useful.

    The Wall Street Journal reports that Apple has confirmed it'll no longer update or support Quicktime 7 for Windows.

    Way back when, QuickTime was a requirement to run iTunes, as the Quicktime code was used in part to provide the music streaming capabilities of the software, which resulted in many people who had iPods – and later, the iPhone – installing the plugin to their Windows PCs when they wanted them to properly work with their computers. As Apple notes on its support page, however, this situation changed in later versions of iTunes, and Quicktime has not been a requirement to run iTunes since October 2011.

    Despite not being relevant for iTunes any more, Quicktime continued to be useful to serve up video on the web. However, with HTML5 encouraging browsers to support video directly as part of the standard language of the internet, having a separate plugin for the ability now appears redundant. The combination of these two factors appears to have encouraged Apple to have made the decision to no longer support the plugin on Windows.

    The announcement comes a week after the Department of Homeland Security recommended Windows users uninstall Quicktime because of potential security holes, making Quicktime potentially vulnerable and use of it on Windows PCs a major security risk (these flaws do not affect the Mac OS version, which remains in support). Given its status as a potential security threat and the lack of any updates coming from Apple, many sources, including us at Technically Motivated, now recommend that Quicktime is removed from all Windows PCs as soon as possible.

    For those who are unsure how to, Apple's official support pages offer a guide for how to remove Quicktime from Windows PCs. Apple have been reached for comment to confirm the Wall Street Journal's report.

    Digiprove sealThis informative article has been Digiproved © 2016
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    Jan
    27
    2016

    Lenovo Grilled By Security Researchers over poor ShareIT Security

    Computer users often make very basic mistakes that make more sensible people wonder just what they were thinking. Case in point: passwords. Splashdata recently published its fifth annual list of the most commonly-used passwords by computer users in North America and Western Europe; and many people will be hitting their heads against their desks when they learn that obvious choices like "password" and "12345678" still top the list.

    While you can expect individuals to make basic mistakes like these, you would assume actual computer manufacturers would be smarter. But if the latest headlines are to be believed, it seems Lenovo's software developers could do with reading this list themselves. As revealed in an advisory posted by Core Security, Lenovo's ShareIT file-sharing software – built in to their computers – has a very serious password-related flaw.

    How bad? The Wi-Fi Network created and used for transferring files between Windows computers "securely" uses a very predictable password: 12345678. Even worse, this password is "hardcoded" into the software, making it impossible for users to change it to something much more secure. The problem is even worse for Android users, where the ShareIT app has no password at all, leaving the network entirely open for anyone within radio range to connect to.

    The implications for the security of transferred files is serious. Merely using a web browser to connect to a ShareIT network can reveal all the files currently stored on the platform by the affected user. While the files cannot be downloaded this way, the researchers also discovered that the files are transferred insecurely, without any kind of encryption, meaning the simple use of a traffic sniffer once connected could allow anyone to obtain a copy of any transferred file.

    Luckily, the flaws may not exist much longer. Lenovo claim that since being made aware of the issues in October last year, the company has worked to bring the software up to snuff. Those running ShareIT on Windows or Android are now advised to download the latest version of the software from the ShareIT website, which was released this week and claims to resolve all the issues found by the Core Security researchers. Given that this is not the first time Lenovo have been found to engage in shady security practices, however, it may be time to think twice about that ThinkPad.

    Sep
    17
    2015

    [Review] Mini Tool Power Data Recovery 7.0

    We've all had that moment. You delete a file that you didn't mean to, or that you didn't think you'd need at the time; you empty the Recycle Bin; and then suddenly you realise – damn, I actually needed that! You probably also thought the file was gone for good – deleting it from the Recycle Bin was your last chance to get it back, right? Wrong!

    When files are deleted in Windows, Windows simply "forgets" about the file, acting like it no longer exists; and tells the hard drive it was stored on that it can use the space owned by that file again. A file is only truly "erased" when the space it used is fully written over. This means if you act fast, you can usually recover a file that you've deleted entirely from Windows, with minimal to no damage. To do this, you need a File Recovery tool. One such tool is Mini Tool Power Data Recovery – but is it as good as it sounds? In this article, we run it through its paces.

    Setup

    It is not very often when reviewing software that I start by talking about the setup process itself, because most Windows software that uses an installer to set up the software for your computer works in broadly similar ways – click Next, review the Licence and agree to it (if there is one), choose where to put the software, add extra options such as Desktop Icons, and click Next again and let it do its work. The setup for MiniTool Power Data Recovery is no different, bar one exception. As I mentioned in the introduction to this review, it's important that if you are trying to recover a document, you do not write new data to the drive you are trying to recover from, because any new data could overwrite that document and make it irrecoverable. To that end, the setup for MiniTool Power Data Recovery warns you of this fact, asking you to confirm the location you want to install the program to and reminding you not to install to the same drive you want to recover from as soon as you click "Next" on "Select Destination Location" – regardless of where you install the program to.

    That warning message, asking you to confirm you want to install to the specified location

    That warning message, asking you to confirm you want to install to the specified location

    To some, this message may come across as a little scary, and may suggest that any folder you install the program to is wrong. However, it is simply providing useful advice and asking you to double-check your choice to make sure you don't do something you'll regret later. Kudos, Mini Tool!

    First Impressions

    After installing MiniTool Power Data Recovery and running it for the first time, you'll be presented with the main interface for MiniTool Power Data Recovery, which will also appear first in all subsequent runs.

    The main interface

    The main interface

    MiniTool Power Data Recovery is mostly geared towards recovering lost files, whether those accidentally deleted as mentioned in my introduction, or in the case of removable media, through formatting. To that end, the tool includes three file-related recovery options – Undelete Recovery, Digital Media Recovery and CD/DVD Recovery. But MPDR (to give it a shorter title) has a far greater remit, as the tool also includes the ability to recover whole disk partitions that have been damaged (Damaged Partition Recovery) or can no longer be found by the target computer (Lost Partition Recovery). All of these tools are presented on the main interface in large, two-tone buttons (not unlike the tiled interface of more recent Windows and Windows Phone releases); and mousing over an option presents a description of the tool accompanied by a charming animation of the tool’s icon – for example, mousing over “Undelete Files” makes the trash can icon lift and shake its lid for a moment, while the label changes to explain that the tool offers the ability to “Quick scan, recover deleted files”.

    Our testing methodology

    Obviously, when it comes to tools that claim to recover deleted files, it’s important to test that the software can both find deleted files; and how well it recovers them. We tested Mini Tool Power Data Recovery by first creating and then permanently deleting two files to see if the software would succeed in both counts.

    The first of these two files was a text file, which we called “Recoverme.txt”, containing simply a sentence of dummy text:

    (No caption)

    (No caption)

    The second was an image, a copy of our website’s logo. This way, we would get a good measure of the tool’s ability to find and recover both small, simple files and larger, more complicated ones.

    Our website's logo, which we used as part of the test.

    Our website’s logo, which we used as part of the test.

    Undelete Recovery

    For many people, Undelete Recovery is likely to be the feature they will use the most. This tool is designed to help people recover individual files that have been permanently deleted or lost from their computer.

    After clicking "Undelete Recovery" from the first screen

    After clicking “Undelete Recovery” from the first screen

    Upon clicking the icon for Undelete Recovery, there will be a quick loading bar, and the program will present you with a list of drives attached to your computer. Simply select the one where the lost files are found; and click Scan. As the description of the tool states, MiniTool Power Data Recovery performs a quick scan (no more than a minute in my tests on a 250GB hard drive); and then presents you with the files it has found which may be recoverable:

    The same results in "List" view.

    The same results in “List” view.

    The results of the scan can be seen in one of two methods, which can be selected using tabs below the blue toolbar. By default, the list starts in “List” view, which presents you with a list of files and folders similar to browsing a folder tree in Explorer. In this view, files are grouped into the folder the program believes they may have come from, allowing you to find a file by where you last remember it being. There is also a “Lost Files” folder, for files that have no last known location.

    The results of a test scan in "Type" view, one of the two available views.

    The results of a test scan in “Type” view, one of the two available views.

    In “Type” view, seen above, the results are organised by the type of file that the tool has found, with separate sections for “Pictures”, “Archives” (things like Zip Files and installers), and so on, with other files or those of unknown type getting placed into an “Other Files” category. This view can be useful for finding a specific file when you know what it was you need to recover, but can’t remember where it was. However, our testing returned many files that were simply classified as “other”, and only three files that were categorised in any way, suggesting this view may not always work as intended. Results will obviously vary on a person-by-person basis and the level of usage of the drive in question.

    Unfortunately, because Undelete Recovery only performs quick scans, it may not search the computer very thoroughly and may miss files even if they were only recently deleted. In our test, Undelete Recovery twice failed to locate the files we created and deleted despite being ran only a short time afterwards. This means it may fail to be a solution for many people who need their files recovered without waiting for the more thorough, but longer scans to complete.

    Digital Media Recovery

    “Recover lost photos, mp3/mp4 files and video files from flash drives and memory sticks.” While this tool’s name and description may imply that it’s tailored mostly toward scanning SD Cards and USB Sticks etc, or for finding pictures and video, Digital Media Recovery is really MiniTool Power Data Recovery’s equivalent to a “full scan”, as opposed to Undelete Recovery’s “Quick Scan”. As a result, it takes a much longer time to complete, but finds and identifies a much wider array of files – many more than the tool’s description may suggest, including Microsoft Office and OpenOffice Files. In fact, during testing, the same 250GB hard drive that scanned in a minute using Undelete Recovery was estimated to take 9 hours in Digital Media Recovery mode.

    MiniTool Power Data Recovery - Digital Media Recovery - Scan Progress Dialog

    This will take a while…

    This is a preview for an upcoming article, which is not yet completed. Come back soon to read the full article!

    Sep
    04
    2015

    Skype users continue to be plagued by ongoing bogus messages

    Despite first being reported over a month ago, prompting Microsoft to advise Skype users to change their passwords, Skype users remain in the dark over a security issue that has resulted in their accounts sending out spam unnoticed, with Microsoft seemingly unable to rectify the problem.

    The problem, first reported on a Skype community forum over a month ago, sees random Skype users send out messages to multiple contacts on their contact list that were not sent by the user themselves. The messages include links to spam websites, which are always disguised using goo.gl short links. The problem has been reported to affect both old and new accounts, including those that have not been logged into in some time; and reports state even accounts that have not been linked to Windows Live accounts are appearing to send spam.

    Though the cause of the issue is yet unknown, some evidence by users suggests the issue could be a vulnerability with Skype's web client. Although the spam messages do not appear in the chat history of affected users when using a Desktop or Mobile version of the Skype client, some users who have been told their accounts have sent the spam messages have been able to see them in conversation windows that appear when the web client is used. Microsoft are yet to confirm these claims, having passed the buck several times already – the company has so far blamed weak passwords; malware on the affected user's computers; and an issue with linked accounts as potential causes.

    Microsoft continue to advise users affected by this issue to change their passwords; and state that they are continuing to look into the matter.

    Jun
    16
    2015

    LastPass Hacked: Users Encouraged to Change Master Passwords

    What happens when a service designed to keep your passwords safe gets hacked itself?

    LastPass Logo

    Password-management service LastPass announced today that it “discovered and blocked suspicious activity” on its network on Friday that caused user email addresses, authentication hashes, password reminders and server per user salts to be compromised.

    While the news suggests that some user’s email addresses may now be known to criminals and that hackers may now have useful hints to passwords for other sites you may be using, LastPass says that there is no evidence that any data from any user’s vault was taken; or that any accounts were logged into illegitimately before the hack was detected. This means that any of the passwords actually stored on the server have not fallen into the wrong hands, so there should be no need to reset passwords for every site you stored data for. LastPass is confident that its encryption is strong enough to make attacking those stolen hashes with any speed difficult.

    Nevertheless, when it comes to LastPass itself, it is highly recommended you change your Master Password right now to ensure those vaults can’t potentially be accessed later. Although the company’s official recommendation is that you only need to change your master password if it’s weak or use that password on multiple sites, in any case of hacking, being paranoid is often the best approach. The company also recommends that users who don’t have two-factor authentication enabled on their accounts do so now, which sounds like sound advice.

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    May
    12
    2015

    [Review] Aomei Backupper 2.5 Standard Edition

    Making backups of important data stored on your computer (or media attached to it) is always very important – if something happens to your technology and you can’t use it any more, can you afford to lose what you had stored on it? The importance of ensuring you’re prepared for any failure – and thus never regret not having a copy when the worst happens – is one of the reasons why software to automate and/or simplify the process of making backups is such a large industry, with tons of different tools on the market.

    We’ve reviewed one of these tools – Aomei Backupper – on three separate occasions in the past – but now the developer, Aomei Technology, have been in touch to say that they have released a new version of their popular backup tool which adds even more capabilities to your standard backup software, including features in the free version that are normally only found in paid editions of competing backup products.

    What’s New

    Having said all this, were you to have used a previous version of Aomei Backupper and then upgrade to 2.5, it is unlikely you’ll see much of a difference from first glance:

    Aomei Backupper 1.6 Home Screen (aka Backup Management)

    The “Home” screen shown on opening the software in Aomei Backupper v1.6…

    Aomei Backupper 2.5 Home Screen (aka Backup Management)

    …And the same screen in Aomei Backupper Standard Edition 2.5 (click pictures to enlarge)

    Except for the “Freeware” label having changed to “Upgrade” (as Aomei Backupper is now under a commercial licence and has paid upgrades available), the interface is very similar to that of previous releases.

    There IS, however, a small difference here, which is represented by a new icon on the 2.5 screen depicting an arrow pointing to a box. This leads to a new “Import / Export Configuration” Screen, where the list of Backup Tasks you have set up in Aomei Backupper can itself be backed up for later use, or restored from a previous export.

    The main new feature of Aomei Backupper 2.5 revolves around the System Restore feature. Although the feature itself came in as of v2.1, 2.5 makes huge improvements over the previous editions. A newly supported feature is Universal Restore, which allows Aomei Backupper to potentially move everything stored on one computer to another one. Universal Restore allows a backup made on one type of hardware to be restored on another computer with dissimilar or even completely different hardware, making it perfect for those who might, for example, want to upgrade their laptop or desktop computer but keep hold of all their data. Backupper can also restore backups made on an MBR-based disk to a GPT-based one and vice-versa; so if your new computer boots using a modern UEFI-based system rather than the old style BIOS, you’ll still be able to use the restore. This means there is now little standing in the way of Backupper being able to restore data from different devices even if your new computer ends up having little in common with your old one.

    A slight caveat exists here, however (read more…)

    Mar
    10
    2014

    How to check your Antivirus is properly working

    Some of the worst viruses to hit Windows – and even a few not-so-bad ones – make every attempt to make cleaning your computer difficult, through methods such as disabling your antivirus, interfering with opening the Security Centre or any cleaning or security tools your computer may be running, and even in some cases modifying your computer's HOSTS file so even going on the internet can either be blocked or have you redirected from real sites to illegitimate ones. This is why it's important to block viruses before they spread.

    Most competent anti-malware programs contain real-time protection shields to block viruses and other malware as soon as they crop up; and a fair few even include internet shields to stop downloads and take you away from infected sites that are likely to give you a virus. But what if you're ALREADY compromised? If there's already a virus on your computer that's changing the websites you visit and disabling your antimalware shields, etc. – then you might not even know you're infected and your computer could even be open to further infections, without you knowing they're coming in. Fortunately, there's an easy way to find out if your security is working as expected.

    Most companies working in computer security are members of, or are regulated by, various institutes across the globe who want to make sure every threat is being properly dealt with and every anti-malware does a competent job in keeping users safe. In Europe, the main one of these is the European Institute for Computer Antivirus Research, or EICAR for short. EICAR do a lot of research into computer viruses; and their research is shared with the makers of anti-malware products to improve detections, identify new viruses and basically keep the security you're using in working order. One of the ways they do these is by releasing test files, which contain specific messages not found in most ordinary programs. The test files are not viruses, but antivirus and antimalware programs are asked to treat them as one; and because the messages are unique to the test file, if the product DOES warn about the test file when it sees one, it's probably a good sign you're properly protected.

    You can make one of the EICAR Test Files yourself through a simple text editor like Notepad, allowing you a quick way to test your security is in working order. Just do the following:

    • Launch Notepad on your computer
    • Copy and paste the following line into the Notepad file:

      X5O!P%@AP[4\PZX54(P^)7CC)7}$EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$H+H*
       

    • Save the File. In the Save Dialog, change "Save As Type:" to "All Files". Then save the file with any name ending ".com" – for example eicar.com

    If your antivirus is working and capable, during or within a few seconds of the file being saved, your antivirus should block and warn about the new file. You may even be told the file has been automatically deleted or moved to the quarantine / virus chest. Any of these messages is a good sign your antivirus is working.

    If your antivirus also includes an on-demand scanner, you can also use this file to test that. First, restore the file from quarantine if your antivirus moved it earlier (check your antivirus product's documentation on how to do this). Then run a scan. If the antivirus product finds an infection in the file you saved using the steps above, you can be assured everything is in proper working order.

    If you didn't get warned about the file when you saved it; and it wasn't found in a scan – then it may be time to investigate as your computer may have been compromised and your security is under threat.

    The EICAR Test File is a great way to ensure your antivirus' protection and scanning routines are working exactly as they should be, without damaging the security of your computer. And you can easily delete the file once you're done to stop being warned about it again; and re-create it later if you want to test another time.

    Feb
    16
    2014

    Hackers steal Usernames, addresses, encrypted passwords and more details of Kickstarter users, change your password now!

    An undisclosed number of Kickstarter users have been emailed with advice to reset their passwords after the company was made aware of a data breach that may have led to the disclosure of personal information.

    Some time in the last 24 hours, Kickstarter updated their website to display a banner on the top of its site for logged-in users, advising them to change their password and providing a link to do so. The advice comes following a statement by Kickstarter – which was emailed to an undisclosed number of users – stating the company was made aware “by law enforcement officials” of hackers breaching their servers to steal account-related information. The advice also recommended users consider using tools such as 1Password or LastPass, which as well as offering storage to let you remember all your passwords, also include password generators to come up with randomised, highly-secure passwords (might I also recommend KeyPass, which does the same but also contains a meter telling you how “secure” any password you type in is likely to be?)

    The following is the full text of the email as sent out by Kickstarter – I’ll leave the explaining to them as it puts it better than I could myself:

    “On Wednesday night, law enforcement officials contacted Kickstarter and alerted us that hackers had sought and gained unauthorized access to some of our customers’ data. Upon learning this, we immediately closed the security breach and began strengthening security measures throughout the Kickstarter system.

    No credit card data of any kind was accessed by hackers. There is no evidence of unauthorized activity of any kind on your account.

    While no credit card data was accessed, some information about our customers was. Accessed information included usernames, email addresses, mailing addresses, phone numbers, and encrypted passwords. Actual passwords were not revealed, however it is possible for a malicious person with enough computing power to guess and crack an encrypted password, particularly a weak or obvious one.

    As a precaution, we strongly recommend that you change the password of your Kickstarter account, and other accounts where you use this password.

    To change your password, log in to your account at Kickstarter.com and look for the banner at the top of the page to create a new, secure password. We recommend you do the same on other sites where you use this password. For additional help with password security, we recommend tools like 1Password and LastPass.

    We’re incredibly sorry that this happened. We set a very high bar for how we serve our community, and this incident is frustrating and upsetting. We have since improved our security procedures and systems in numerous ways, and we will continue to do so in the weeks and months to come. We are working closely with law enforcement, and we are doing everything in our power to prevent this from happening again.

    Kickstarter is a vibrant community like no other, and we can’t thank you enough for being a part of it. Please let us know if you have any questions, comments, or concerns. You can reach us at accountsecurity@kickstarter.com.

    While it’s disappointing to hear of any type of hack where data is stolen – and a sad reflection of the state of the world today that not even a website that exists to give those with ideas but no money to make them real, the chance to connect with their potential market and get the funding they need, is safe from being hacked – it’s reassuring to see a company own up to the breach so quickly and waste no time in attempting to secure their service better and protect their users. I hope more companies learn from this example.

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