Nov
05
2010

Google Chrome 9 Released for Developers

Google has officially released Chrome 9 version of its web browser in the Developer Channel for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux platforms. The new Google Chrome 9.0.570.0 build is specifically meant for developers to try out, as it contains significant behind-the-scenes changes that regular users may not notice, but could cause instability and so favours those with good knowledge of the way software code works. (If you’re one of these people, the list of changes can be found here.)  Basically, the changes include some security fixes and several minor changes to make it run faster. No new features are added at this moment though, so those looking for new toys will get nothing out of this.

Google Chrome 9 "About" box.

The "About Google Chrome" dialogue in the new 9.0 Developer release.

Last month, Chrome 8.0.552.xx beta version was released in developer channel, but a stable Chrome 8 release has yet to emerge. With this new arrival though, we believe that a stable build of Chrome 8 may finally be released in the coming weeks – or days. Google has confirmed, however, that it is aiming to release Chrome 9 by November 29. You can download the Chrome 9 Dev version here.

Digiprove sealThis informative article has been Digiproved © 2010

5 Responses

  1. Great article, keep em’ coming!

  2. I’ve been gold bricking here at work all day and my boss would certainly kill me if she found out I was reading this stuff all afternoon! OK, admin, some questions. How long did it normally take you to compose a blog here? And how costly is it to pay for hosting per month? It would be nice to have a page of my own on the net. However I’ve never actually ran one before, so here I am asking you. It would really give me a head start, if you could either email me or respond here… thank you.

    • Well if you use WordPress, which has become the leading force in Blogs lately, setting up a blog is simple – just upload it to a webhost and go through a simple five-minute installer, or go to WordPress.com to get one hosted for you. After that, you’re pretty much set, but then you just need to add in themes, add-ons and so on to make the blog look and work exactly how YOU’d like it to. If you already know what you want, setting up a blog to match can take no more than ten minutes.

      The WordPress.com hosting is free, and you get support from the team behind it, but you don’t get all the features. Hosting it yourself is better, and the cost is just whatever you’d pay to keep up the hosting – and there are some pretty cheap hosts out there that support WordPress. Of course, if you want your own URL for the blog, you’ll have to register one at a domain registrar, and this can cost £7.50 ($10) a year on average, and you’d have to renew it every year to keep it. But it’s not expensive at all really to host a blog, IF you know the right places to look!

  3. Hey! I just read another post in another blog that looked like this. How do you know all this stuff? That’s one great post.

    • When you get yourself involved in technology for long enough, and pay attention to everything going on, eventually you become a bit of an expert yourself. Plus, it always helps if you know good sources for your information, because the sooner that you can find out about something and be sure it’s true, the sooner you can post about it too and be sure people will pay attention to it.

      That said, I consider it highly coincidential if a post in another blog looked incredibly similar to one I’ve posted, because I always try to add my own little spin on the story, to make it unique. Basically, I write it like I say it – so if someone has written the exact same thing, I’ll be very shocked because they must think alike! (That, or they’ve stolen from me <_<)